• A History of Computing
  • A History of Computing
  • A History of Computing
  • A History of Computing
  • A History of Computing

A History of Computing

A History of Computing

Service Pack: Core Service

Subject: History ICT

Expert Insight into the machines that helped shape our digital future

The aim of A History of Computing resource is to promote the idea that by understanding our digital heritage we can better understand our digital future.

This resource features unique resources to help understand how British Computing developments have influenced the world we all live in. It also provides an extensive range of material to show how British Innovation in Computing continues impact on our world today and shape all our tomorrows.

The resource features:

  • Unique video and photographic resources from the National Museum of Computing - offering an expert insight into the iconic British computing systems from the past 70 years
  • Extensive curriculum material created by practising Computing and ICT teachers - all mapped to the new National Curriculum

Advice for teachers

A History of Computing resource represents a strategic response from LGfL and other members of the National Education Network to the change to the Computing element of the National Curriculum and the shift away from the ICT curriculum. The resource aims to provide a unique, high quality and relevant resource for teachers.

Please note: It does not try and support all aspects of the Computing Curriculum.

There are a number of resources that will help potential users of the resource gain a quick insight into what the resource includes.

Teachers are encouraged to:

  • Watch the video introduction
  • View the curriculum mapping
  • View the resource bank section and understand how the filters for the different elements of the resource

The video material is used to support a broad range of complete lesson activities to cover Key Stages 2 to 5, however teachers are encouraged to modify the suggested activities and tailor them to support the needs of their particular teaching context. Teachers will find content throughout the resource that they will be able to use with their target Key Stage.

Video ‘embed’ codes allow teachers to disaggregate the video material into a learning platform and build their own learning pathways through the curriculum linked activities.

The resource has also been built to support independent research activities for students into the topics covered.

Why has this resource been created?

A History of Computing resource represents a strategic response from LGfL and other members of the National Education Network to the change to the Computing element of the National Curriculum and the shift away from the ICT curriculum. The resource aims to provide a unique, high quality and relevant resource for teachers. Please note: It does not try and support all aspects of the Computing Curriculum.

Who can access this resource?

This resource is made available to all TRUSTnet Schools and schools connected to the National Education Network through their Regional Learning Grid. The resource will be accessible to any teacher or student viewing it from their school network connection. When viewed outside of the school network – a USO login prompt will appear.

TRUSTnet connected schools will be able to access the resource when ‘off grid’ using the USO log in. If teacher is from a NEN connected school, but it is not a TRUSTnet connection, but would like to access this resource when ‘off grid’, they should contact content support.lgfl.org.uk to discuss their requirements.

Who has helped create this resource?

A wide range of practicing teachers, local authority consultants, and experts from the world of Computing History have been involved in the creation of this resource. Not all the organisations contacted were able to offer their direct input into the resource creation, but a broad range of potential partners were sought to produce this unique resource. The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park has been the main development partner for the resource creation.

Which parts of the Computing Curriculum does this resource cover?

A comprehensive mapping of how the different elements of this resource relate to the new computing curriculum has been provided. It features a detailed analysis of how the different sections of the resource link in with the new programmes of study.

There are sections of the resource that do not directly link to the National Curriculum – but have been included to support the development of a student’s understanding of the issues and concepts behind many parts of the curriculum related material.

Is this resource aimed at teachers or for students to use independently?

The resource is designed to support both of these approaches. In particular, teachers are encouraged to show the resource during in school learning sessions, and then students will view the resources in their own time and ‘immerse’ themselves with the wider background material, outside of lesson time.

What are the different ways in which I can use this resource?

The video material is used to support a broad range of complete lesson activities to cover Key Stages 2 to 5, however teachers are encouraged to modify the suggested activities and tailor them to support the needs of their particular teaching context.

Video ‘embed’ codes allow teachers to disaggregate the video material into a learning platform and build their own learning pathways through the curriculum linked activities.

The resource has also been built to support independent research activities for students into the topics covered.

Is this resource for Primary or Secondary teachers?

The resource has been created to support both primary and secondary teachers. There are sections in the resource that have notionally been divided up between different Key Stages. However, all teachers are strongly recommended to look through all the sections of the resource.

Many teachers may find that sections that are for a different Key Stage to those they are directly supporting offer use differentiated material for different abilities within their learning groups. The overlap between sections in terms of concepts and curriculum coverage is deliberate to offer a flexible resource for teachers to work with.

Access to Learning Resources both in and away from school site is freely available with a TRUSTnet Core Service subscription.

TRUSTnet

Use and adapt

School community only

Use and adapt

Use and
adapt

No commercial use

No commercial use

School community access only

School-community access only

Permitted uses:

  • Downloading and editing of photographs, documents and text. Adaptations allowed for educational use within the school community, including viewing by students' parents – but with access restricted to the school community, controlled by the TRUSTnet USO login
  • Creation of new teaching and learning material using TRUSTnet learning resources

Not permitted:

  • Downloading and re–editing of video resources
  • Republishing of any video material in a different hosting environment or format
  • Removal of any LGfL branding embedded within assets
  • Removal of any content-provider branding embedded within licensed resources
  • Any commercial use of the resource
  • Sharing of login credentials with an unauthorised person to gain access to TRUSTnet licensed resources*

*An unauthorised user is defined as a child or adult who does not attend a TRUSTnet - connected school. Parents of children in TRUSTnet schools are exempted from this definition to the extent that and only in so far as parents are encouraged to log in with their children to view resources that support home learning.

To find out more about TRUSTnet educational licences and why they are necessary please take a look at our TRUSTnet educational licences FAQ page.

Optimised for mobile devices

This resource has been optimised for mobile devices including iPads and iPhones.

Foreword by Doron Swade (MBE)

"This resource tells some of the story of a history of computing. It is a window into the marvels of the pioneering era of automatic computing and the role of British contributions.

The present is rooted in the past. So to understand the present, and the trajectory of possible futures, we need to understand how we got here. This is doubly important for generations of youngsters born into a world in which computers are taken for granted and who were not themselves witness to the unfolding tale.

It is very difficult to strike a balance between technical 'facts', and the meaning or wider significance of such facts. This resource is exceptional in the sure-footed skill with which it blends the two. The presentations and materials are models of clarity that allow the user to engage directly with the material in a way that is both reassuring and enjoyable.

I am confident that for years to come those using this resource will share the pleasure and interest as those who contributed to it."

 

Doron Swade

 

Doron Swade (MBE)

Formerly Curator of Computing, and Assistant Director & Head of Collections, Science Museum

Computing at School

 

"A History of Computing represents the culmination of many months work and the care that was put in is certainly evident. The combination of text, video, images, and educational resources provides a unique perspective on computing and IT, and on how Britain has contributed to the development of one of the world's most important industries. Students and teachers will gain useful insights into the ingenuity and creativity with which problems were solved in the past. This is particularly valuable, as creative problem-solving lies at the heart of the new National Curriculum, and the idea of computing as a creative discipline is both a powerful motivational tool and a key to understanding what makes it so exciting.

The materials will be of use to teachers both within and outside computing, providing resources across a range of curriculum areas that may be used with pupils at Key Stages 2 to 5. We believe that the example lesson plans will inspire teachers to produce materials of their own, focused both on the way things are done now, and on the lessons we can learn from history.

CAS is very pleased to endorse these materials, and looks forward to continuing to work closely with LGfL and other members of the National Education Network. We are keen to hear from teachers who are using the materials, and to receive contributions to CAS Online that will help others to make use of A History of Computing in their teaching. We would particularly welcome teaching resources that explore the technical aspects of the machines featured on the LGfL site, and how they are related to modern machines."

 

Doron Swade

 

Stephen Hunt

Senior Lecturer in Computer Science, University of Hertfordshire

Assistant National Coordinator, Computing At School